Emil McAvoy, October 2017

Catalogue Text for Disco Volante

In Situ Photo Project, Christchurch, New Zealand

17th October - 10th November 2017

"Disco Volante is the Italian translation of ‘flying disk’. Appropriating this term reminds us the UFO phenomenon is a universal one, with numerous sightings recorded worldwide which are interpreted within diverse yet specific cultural and historical frameworks. Boreham’s gesture at once evokes the exoticism and otherness of these encounters, while foregrounding the local in their interpretation."

-> FULL ARTICLE

 

Peter Ireland, 2016

Long to Reign Over Us: Caryline Boreham Photographs the Queen's Portraits

Catalogue Text for Royal Tour

TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre, Pah Homestead, Auckland, New Zealand

29th February to 8th April 2017

"An image from the Howick RSA, depicts the royal portrait retired to the basement, reigning over a trestle table and a broken chair; a harbinger, perhaps, of a time to come.  The documentary tradition of picturing sites unpeopled only reinforces this impression of irrelevance, and even where human figures are present, no one is taking any notice of the portraits. The constitutional back-stop they represent seems to have relegated them to the back-water of our consciousness."

-> FULL ARTICLE

Peter Ireland, 30th November, 2015

"Can Do" PhotographyEyeContact Review of Selective Exposure

Curated by Haruhika Sameshima; Photospace, Wellington, New Zealand

16th October - 2nd November 2015

"Boreham’s mute queen asks a question. And it’s to do with our colonial origins and how long they might tether us to a European heritage when our presence is in the Pacific and our future in association with Asia’s."

-> FULL ARTICLE    -> LINK TO EYECONTACT URL

John Hurrell, 23rd December, 2014

Boreham's Spatial Interiors, EyeContact Review of State Space

Billboards Project. Te Tuhi Centre for the Arts, Manukau, New Zealand

15th November 2014 to 15th February 2015

"Of the three images, the one of the office in Archives New Zealand is particularly compelling. Pressed up against the walls are thick rows of wooden filing boxes stacked up five high. They are mesmerising because their labels have odd L-shaped clusters of stickers repeated over and over. The asymmetry of the lopsided classification listings fascinates; there seem to be different components jammed together, each based on a different variety of information."
 

-> FULL ARTICLE    -> LINK TO EYECONTACT URL

Peter Dornauf, 1st September, 2014

Selected Entries, EyeContact Review of National Contemporary Art Award

Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand

9th August 2014 to 9th November 2014

"Of the photographic entries Queen Elizabeth 11- Howick RSA, by Caryline Boreham, was particularly poignant, funny and political, in an understated way, depicting, in simply documentary fashion, a withered, washout realm that once ruled the waves, the lives and values of people in New Zealand. She explores in her work the hidden yet familiar world of institutional spaces that possess lingering traces of royalty, which in this case involved a somewhat bleached picture of a youngish looking Queen Elizabeth that has been relegated to a basement overlooking a stack of collapsible tables and a broken chair."

 

-> FULL ARTICLE    -> LINK TO EYECONTACT URL

Peter Ireland, 30th August, 2014

Making the CutEyeContact Review of Outer Space

Curated by Mary-Louise Brown and Paula Savage; Two Rooms, Auckland, New Zealand

22nd August - 20th September 2014

"Concealed places happen to be Caryline Boreham’s field of endeavour too - the show’s label states that 'Circus Tent' continue’s Boreham’s fascination with documenting the concealed”

-> FULL ARTICLE    -> LINK TO EYECONTACT URL

John Hurrell, 2nd August, 2012

Reflecting Walls, EyeContact Review of With In

Antoinette Godkin Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand

19th July 2012 to 8th August 2012

"Boreham’s elegant coloured photographs of prison, hospital and airport interiors are oddly beautiful - yet they disturb, profoundly. We see no people at all while observing each room’s glossy grey-green walls, stark lighting and the simplest of furniture or tape barriers. There is a creepy beauty in these clinical settings designed to restrict movement."

 

-> FULL ARTICLE    -> LINK TO EYECONTACT URL